Tag: suicide

PTSD, Withdrawing From Psychiatric Drugs and the Upcoming Release of the Documentary “Medicating Normal”.

Angela Peacock, MSW served in the U.S. Army for seven years as a communications specialist. She deployed to Iraq in 2003 and was medically evacuated due to a non-combat, life-threatening illness. Angela Shares the years of profound life altering pain, loss of her marriage and other punishing reactions and effects of PTSD and withdrawal from psychiatric drugs. Angela shares how blind belief in medical treatment opened the door for much of what she experienced. She provides educational and valuable insights like informed consent and participating in our individual healthcare.    After medical retirement and a long period of recovery, she earned her bachelor’s in science in psychology and master’s in social work from Washington University in St. Louis.  Angela discusses her current work to plan and host community screenings of Medicating Normal across the world where members of the audience are invited to critically think about our modern mental health industry, informed consent, and psychiatric drug use and withdrawal. She is a mental health advocate, a writer, and YouTube creator who travels in her campervan across the United States with her service dog Raider, to improve the mental health care system for veterans and civilians alike. She can be found online @BeingHumanRV.

DISCLAIMER: The information and content shared in each episode of the Stigma Free Vet Zone are for informational purposes only. The Stigma Free Vet Zone hosts, Mike Orban, Bob Bach and Erin Schraufnagel are not, nor claim to be, medical doctors, psychologists, or psychiatrists and should not be held responsible for any claims, medical advice, or therapy/treatment recommendations mentioned on this podcast. Any advice mentioned or shared by Mike Orban, Bob Bach, Erin Schraufnagel or their guests is strictly for purposes of bringing awareness to the veteran community and the services available. Please speak with a medical professional before taking any advice or starting any therapy or treatment discussed or shared on this podcast.

 

A Decorated Marine, Leader, Hero to Family and Friends, Suicide, Devastation and Birth of a New Direction

John D Mason was a combat decorated Vietnam Veteran. Back home he was a husband and hero to his children. To his friend Joe Tate John was also a hero and life long friend. John was a marathon runner and in all regards a respected disciplined man. The news of John D Mason “s suicide was devastating and life shattering for those left behind. This episode shares the reactions of John’s son Bill and dear friend Joe Tate. In very moving detail Joe shares a letter left by John to him explaining John’s emotional and mental state near the end. We are also joined by team members of the Medical College of Wisconsin Captain John D. Mason Veteran Peer Outreach Program. The Captain John D Mason Program was started by Joe and Jennifer Tate. This program and these team members describe the very positive and beneficial outreach as John D. Mason had asked of friend Joe Tate in his last letter, “get them to the VA”. We listen to the dedication of family, friends and volunteers to remember the whole person, the strength , caring, hard working

leader and not focus on nor sit in judgement to a result non of us are qualified to judge.
This is powerful, compassionate, stigma dismantling, informative and educational for anyone affected by this punishing, life changing experience.

With thanks to Bill Mason, Joe Tate, Susan Smykal, Army Veteran Mark Flower, Army Veteran Chris Swift and the Medical College of Wisconsin.   


DISCLAIMER: The information and content shared in each episode of the Stigma Free Vet Zone are for informational purposes only. The Stigma Free Vet Zone hosts, Mike Orban, Bob Bach and Erin Schraufnagel are not, nor claim to be, medical doctors, psychologists, or psychiatrists and should not be held responsible for any claims, medical advice, or therapy/treatment recommendations mentioned on this podcast. Any advice mentioned or shared by Mike Orban, Bob Bach, Erin Schraufnagel or their guests is strictly for purposes of bringing awareness to the veteran community and the services available. Please speak with a medical professional before taking any advice or starting any therapy or treatment discussed or shared on this podcast.
View Video Episode Here:

He wrote, “Get me to the VA so they can stop someone else.”

The Capt. John D. Mason Program aims to save lives by utilizing Veteran peers that go into the community and locate Veterans in need engaging them in VA health services, and other community resources, to live a healthy, productive life.

Captain John D. Mason served in Vietnam with the Second Battalion, Twelfth Marines, Third Marine Division. He was awarded the Bronze Star Medal with the Combat “V” for his valor and honorable service. John reflected on his military training and values when faced with personal and professional challenges. John was kind, smart, funny, hardworking, and a man of impeccable values and integrity who loved his wife and two children, and friends deeply. He struggled silently for many years with depression and PTSD stemming from his time in Vietnam. John didn’t want to burden his family or friends with his inner struggles. That, combined with the stigma of mental illness, prevented him from seeking sufficient treatment for his symptoms.
In 2013, financial distress and pain from a back injury caused his illness to overpower him and he took his own life. John left five suicide letters, and wrote, “Get me to the VA so they can stop someone else.”
Our guests today, Project Coordinator Susan Smykal, Veteran Mark Flower and Veteran Chris Swift discuss the making and operation of the Captain John D.
With a focus on Veteran depression and suicide they will focus attention today on their new Gun Safe Storage Program and Gun Safety Program. With a special guest Afghanistan Veteran Matt McDonell. During readjustment Matt had experienced a crisis with prescription withdrawal. Not understanding where the effects would take him he chose to lock his weapons and give the key to a trusted employee. Matt describes the importance of this decision while in crisis. Matt is the founder of ‘Next 18’ golf camp for disabled veterans and first responders.
SEE More on Matt’s program at www.next18.org
The program is completed with additional resources resources and contact information.
We thank Joe and Jennifer Tate and the Medical College of Wisconsin for this and many other programs dedicated to improving the healthcare of veterans, military families and the human spirit.

DISCLAIMER: The information and content shared in each episode of the Stigma Free Vet Zone are for informational purposes only. The Stigma Free Vet Zone hosts, Mike Orban, Bob Bach and Erin Schraufnagel are not, nor claim to be, medical doctors, psychologists, or psychiatrists and should not be held responsible for any claims, medical advice, or therapy/treatment recommendations mentioned on this podcast. Any advice mentioned or shared by Mike Orban, Bob Bach, Erin Schraufnagel or their guests is strictly for purposes of bringing awareness to the veteran community and the services available. Please speak with a medical professional before taking any advice or starting any therapy or treatment discussed or shared on this podcast.

10th Anniversary ‘Don’t Ask Don’t Tell! There’s more to tell!! | Dawn Strobel

Dawn Strobel grew up in Milwaukee and Cedarburg, WI. Her parents divorced when she was young. Dawns father is a Vietnam veteran who never spoke of his military experience and who Dawn did not have much interaction with while growing up. She would come to know him later in life. Dawn’s mother remarried and yet she and her mother did not have a close mother daughter relationship. With the normal expectations of honor and a place to fit in Dawn enlisted in the United States Army knowing she would have to hide that she was gay. No amount of written English can describe the profound devastation, dishonor and depression she would experience in both military and civilian careers for over thirteen years. “I was in such a suicidal state that I couldn’t live, but I couldn’t die because I had kids. I was stuck in between”.

Only in her own words can this be described and only in her voice can we hear this indomitable spirit that has taken Dawn back into her second career in the the military to so honorably and courageously work to complete what she endeavored to achieve over a decade ago. In addition Dawn has the love and support of her wife and children who she loves so much.


DISCLAIMER: The information and content shared in each episode of the Stigma Free Vet Zone are for informational purposes only. The Stigma Free Vet Zone hosts, Mike Orban, Bob Bach and Erin Schraufnagel are not, nor claim to be, medical doctors, psychologists, or psychiatrists and should not be held responsible for any claims, medical advice, or therapy/treatment recommendations mentioned on this podcast. Any advice mentioned or shared by Mike Orban, Bob Bach, Erin Schraufnagel or their guests is strictly for purposes of bringing awareness to the veteran community and the services available. Please speak with a medical professional before taking any advice or starting any therapy or treatment discussed or shared on this podcast.

David Carlson on Rising Up After a Lifetime of Trauma

David Carlson joins me today to discuss his troubling childhood upbringing – from being raised in chronic toxic environments, acting out and trouble with the law to joining the military and rebuilding his life. He shares his battles with substance abuse, why he chose to join the Army National Guard, and how the structure and discipline he received during basic and infantry training improved his perspective about his self-worth and his sense of identity. He shares his experiences while serving two tours in Iraq and the stark differences in structure and discipline between military life and civilian culture. He also shares his experiences with losing sight of his purpose in life, how CrossFit and what inspired him to dedicate his life to serving and helping others. Working with the Orban Foundation for Veterans to instill hope in those seeking it.

From Under A Bridge to Off A Bridge? | Mark Flower

Mark Flower enlisted in the U.S. Army after graduation from High School. He served, then lived life gaily until issues took hold, bringing him to homelessness and addiction. The hardest step – seeking help – started Mark on his journey in recovery. This recovery is maintained by giving back and by being of service to others who struggle with similar experiences. Giving back helps keep Mark on track in his recovery!

County Veterans Service Officer and Tribal Veterans Service Officer Working for you! Know Your Benefits! Make This Meeting the First and Most Important Step in Transition

” Stigma Free Vet Zone is replaying this important educational episode as we take a short annual break until February 4. We look forward to continuing our mission on veteran depression, suicide and family healthcare.”

 

 

CVSO County Veterans Service Officer.

Who they are and who they work for. When leaving the military and searching for your next  mission or purpose, personal and family health should be the number one priority. The CVSO represents the veteran and not the VA / Veterans Administration. The primary work of the CVSO is to provide and explain every benefit you are entitled to. The CVSO will also explain and help you navigate the complexities of the VA system. Additionally, each county provides various community outreach programs such as help with job applications and transportation. Start this next mission or purpose in your life with a well defined plan of action and a complete understanding of your benefits as well as the resources available to assure a successful outcome for you and your family.

 

Washington County Veterans Service Officer: Kurt Rusch

Email: Kurt.Rusch@Washcowisco.gov

Ozaukee Country Veterans Service Officer: Kevin Johnson

Email: kmcjohnson@co.ozaukee.wi.us


DISCLAIMER: The information and content shared in each episode of the Stigma Free Vet Zone are for informational purposes only. The Stigma Free Vet Zone hosts, Mike Orban, Bob Bach and Erin Schraufnagel are not, nor claim to be, medical doctors, psychologists, or psychiatrists and should not be held responsible for any claims, medical advice, or therapy/treatment recommendations mentioned on this podcast. Any advice mentioned or shared by Mike Orban, Bob Bach, Erin Schraufnagel or their guests is strictly for purposes of bringing awareness to the veteran community and the services available. Please speak with a medical professional before taking any advice or starting any therapy or treatment discussed or shared on this podcast.

Words of Wisdom: The Story Behind One Vietnam Veteran’s Podcast

“There are many of us who have experienced these reactions who are here to tell you there is hope. It’s more important to not worry what the world thinks of your but to set a goal of being happy by yourself in a room when no one else is around,” Orban says.

Community Taskforce on Veteran Suicide Prevention

Follow the progress of Southeast Wisconsin community leaders on the prevention of veteran suicide with the efforts Milwaukee War Memorial, MCW, Rogers Behavioral Health, Vet Center, Aurora, MAVRC, US Dept. of Veterans, CVI, DryHootch, Kubly Foundation, County Veteran Service Officers, WDVA, Center for Suicide Awareness among others task for members.

The Reckoning: Anger, Depression, and Reconciliation with Carol Sprague

Carol joins me today to discuss the reckoning that occurred a decade after Chuck returned injured from Vietnam. She shares the challenges and emotions associated with being the wife of a Veteran who has seen extensive action. Carol shares how Chuck kept his Vietnam experiences to himself for ten years, before his father’s death caused a day of reckoning. She discusses their reconciliation and finding peace through religion and philosophy. Carol also highlights how communication and counseling can help Veterans and their spouses as well as the importance of avoiding shaming and blame.