Tag: death

A Decorated Marine, Leader, Hero to Family and Friends, Suicide, Devastation and Birth of a New Direction

John D Mason was a combat decorated Vietnam Veteran. Back home he was a husband and hero to his children. To his friend Joe Tate John was also a hero and life long friend. John was a marathon runner and in all regards a respected disciplined man. The news of John D Mason “s suicide was devastating and life shattering for those left behind. This episode shares the reactions of John’s son Bill and dear friend Joe Tate. In very moving detail Joe shares a letter left by John to him explaining John’s emotional and mental state near the end. We are also joined by team members of the Medical College of Wisconsin Captain John D. Mason Veteran Peer Outreach Program. The Captain John D Mason Program was started by Joe and Jennifer Tate. This program and these team members describe the very positive and beneficial outreach as John D. Mason had asked of friend Joe Tate in his last letter, “get them to the VA”. We listen to the dedication of family, friends and volunteers to remember the whole person, the strength , caring, hard working

leader and not focus on nor sit in judgement to a result non of us are qualified to judge.
This is powerful, compassionate, stigma dismantling, informative and educational for anyone affected by this punishing, life changing experience.

With thanks to Bill Mason, Joe Tate, Susan Smykal, Army Veteran Mark Flower, Army Veteran Chris Swift and the Medical College of Wisconsin.   


DISCLAIMER: The information and content shared in each episode of the Stigma Free Vet Zone are for informational purposes only. The Stigma Free Vet Zone hosts, Mike Orban, Bob Bach and Erin Schraufnagel are not, nor claim to be, medical doctors, psychologists, or psychiatrists and should not be held responsible for any claims, medical advice, or therapy/treatment recommendations mentioned on this podcast. Any advice mentioned or shared by Mike Orban, Bob Bach, Erin Schraufnagel or their guests is strictly for purposes of bringing awareness to the veteran community and the services available. Please speak with a medical professional before taking any advice or starting any therapy or treatment discussed or shared on this podcast.
View Video Episode Here:

War, Severe Struggles then Finding Peace on the Ranch | Ben Singleton

Ben Singleton grew up in a small town in northwest Indiana. He says the destruction of the World Trade Center on 9/11, which he watched on a television in a high school classroom, ignited a zeal within him to serve his country. He was 18 when he enlisted in the Army after graduation. A year later Ben deployed for the invasion of Iraq as a combat infantryman and paratrooper with the 82nd Airborne division. Three years later he deployed again, this time as a sniper and member of the 4th Infantry division. Singleton re-enlisted twice and left the Army in just under seven years after attaining the rank of Staff Sgt. When he returned to civilian life, Ben encountered a series of struggles, including a troubled marriage. He credits the support of family –mom, dad and younger brother—and friends, with helping him find a healthy way forward. Today, Singleton is the manager of therapeutic riding center called Heaven’s Gait Ranch which is located in a rural community north of Milwaukee. The ranch provides a variety of services to guests of all ages including veterans and individuals with special needs. Ben appreciates the opportunity to make connections with many different people. He calls the work deeply rewarding.


DISCLAIMER: The information and content shared in each episode of the Stigma Free Vet Zone are for informational purposes only. The Stigma Free Vet Zone hosts, Mike Orban, Bob Bach and Erin Schraufnagel are not, nor claim to be, medical doctors, psychologists, or psychiatrists and should not be held responsible for any claims, medical advice, or therapy/treatment recommendations mentioned on this podcast. Any advice mentioned or shared by Mike Orban, Bob Bach, Erin Schraufnagel or their guests is strictly for purposes of bringing awareness to the veteran community and the services available. Please speak with a medical professional before taking any advice or starting any therapy or treatment discussed or shared on this podcast.


Watch Stigma Free Vet Zone’s video Podcast’s on YouTube. Please subscribe to our YouTube page to see the latests videos. If you have questions or comments please leave them in the comments section of our video’s. Thank you for your support!

He wrote, “Get me to the VA so they can stop someone else.”

The Capt. John D. Mason Program aims to save lives by utilizing Veteran peers that go into the community and locate Veterans in need engaging them in VA health services, and other community resources, to live a healthy, productive life.

Captain John D. Mason served in Vietnam with the Second Battalion, Twelfth Marines, Third Marine Division. He was awarded the Bronze Star Medal with the Combat “V” for his valor and honorable service. John reflected on his military training and values when faced with personal and professional challenges. John was kind, smart, funny, hardworking, and a man of impeccable values and integrity who loved his wife and two children, and friends deeply. He struggled silently for many years with depression and PTSD stemming from his time in Vietnam. John didn’t want to burden his family or friends with his inner struggles. That, combined with the stigma of mental illness, prevented him from seeking sufficient treatment for his symptoms.
In 2013, financial distress and pain from a back injury caused his illness to overpower him and he took his own life. John left five suicide letters, and wrote, “Get me to the VA so they can stop someone else.”
Our guests today, Project Coordinator Susan Smykal, Veteran Mark Flower and Veteran Chris Swift discuss the making and operation of the Captain John D.
With a focus on Veteran depression and suicide they will focus attention today on their new Gun Safe Storage Program and Gun Safety Program. With a special guest Afghanistan Veteran Matt McDonell. During readjustment Matt had experienced a crisis with prescription withdrawal. Not understanding where the effects would take him he chose to lock his weapons and give the key to a trusted employee. Matt describes the importance of this decision while in crisis. Matt is the founder of ‘Next 18’ golf camp for disabled veterans and first responders.
SEE More on Matt’s program at www.next18.org
The program is completed with additional resources resources and contact information.
We thank Joe and Jennifer Tate and the Medical College of Wisconsin for this and many other programs dedicated to improving the healthcare of veterans, military families and the human spirit.

DISCLAIMER: The information and content shared in each episode of the Stigma Free Vet Zone are for informational purposes only. The Stigma Free Vet Zone hosts, Mike Orban, Bob Bach and Erin Schraufnagel are not, nor claim to be, medical doctors, psychologists, or psychiatrists and should not be held responsible for any claims, medical advice, or therapy/treatment recommendations mentioned on this podcast. Any advice mentioned or shared by Mike Orban, Bob Bach, Erin Schraufnagel or their guests is strictly for purposes of bringing awareness to the veteran community and the services available. Please speak with a medical professional before taking any advice or starting any therapy or treatment discussed or shared on this podcast.

From Under A Bridge to Off A Bridge? | Mark Flower

Mark Flower enlisted in the U.S. Army after graduation from High School. He served, then lived life gaily until issues took hold, bringing him to homelessness and addiction. The hardest step – seeking help – started Mark on his journey in recovery. This recovery is maintained by giving back and by being of service to others who struggle with similar experiences. Giving back helps keep Mark on track in his recovery!

County Veterans Service Officer and Tribal Veterans Service Officer Working for you! Know Your Benefits! Make This Meeting the First and Most Important Step in Transition

” Stigma Free Vet Zone is replaying this important educational episode as we take a short annual break until February 4. We look forward to continuing our mission on veteran depression, suicide and family healthcare.”

 

 

CVSO County Veterans Service Officer.

Who they are and who they work for. When leaving the military and searching for your next  mission or purpose, personal and family health should be the number one priority. The CVSO represents the veteran and not the VA / Veterans Administration. The primary work of the CVSO is to provide and explain every benefit you are entitled to. The CVSO will also explain and help you navigate the complexities of the VA system. Additionally, each county provides various community outreach programs such as help with job applications and transportation. Start this next mission or purpose in your life with a well defined plan of action and a complete understanding of your benefits as well as the resources available to assure a successful outcome for you and your family.

 

Washington County Veterans Service Officer: Kurt Rusch

Email: Kurt.Rusch@Washcowisco.gov

Ozaukee Country Veterans Service Officer: Kevin Johnson

Email: kmcjohnson@co.ozaukee.wi.us


DISCLAIMER: The information and content shared in each episode of the Stigma Free Vet Zone are for informational purposes only. The Stigma Free Vet Zone hosts, Mike Orban, Bob Bach and Erin Schraufnagel are not, nor claim to be, medical doctors, psychologists, or psychiatrists and should not be held responsible for any claims, medical advice, or therapy/treatment recommendations mentioned on this podcast. Any advice mentioned or shared by Mike Orban, Bob Bach, Erin Schraufnagel or their guests is strictly for purposes of bringing awareness to the veteran community and the services available. Please speak with a medical professional before taking any advice or starting any therapy or treatment discussed or shared on this podcast.

Words of Wisdom: The Story Behind One Vietnam Veteran’s Podcast

“There are many of us who have experienced these reactions who are here to tell you there is hope. It’s more important to not worry what the world thinks of your but to set a goal of being happy by yourself in a room when no one else is around,” Orban says.

Bodies, Bones and Biologics – Mark Foreman | Pt. III

n the finale of this three-part series, Mark Foreman reflects thirty years later. Now allergic to morphine, osteomyelitis has returned to Foreman’s hip. He has had three major surgeries, all performed without pain killers. The resulting agony caused Mark to desperately search for any instrument within reach to end his pain by ending his existence. That is until once more the power of love saves his life.

Bodies, Bones and Biologics – Mark Foreman | Pt. II

The pain of his wound — so severe — he wished only for another bullet to end his life.

In this episode, Mark Foreman’s greatest insight is recognizing his only success in life would come from taking responsibility for his actions and goals. No mental health professional, family member nor university — no one — but he would ever again build his vision of what his life is and his place in that life. This is profoundly courageous and significant thinking. When understood this is the most fulfilling path in life.

Bodies, Bones and Biologics – Mark Foreman | Pt. I

Eighty percent of his Marine company was killed in the first ten minutes of a battle that lasted six days. Foreman was wounded on the second day and sustained such intense pain he wished only for another bullet to end his life. He laid on the jungle floor for nearly a week with a shattered hip that prevented him from responding to the screams of wounded and dying Marines scattered around him. Foreman’s evacuation from the battlefield marked the end of one war and the beginning of another.