Tag: combat

County Veterans Service Officer and Tribal Veterans Service Officer Working for you! Know Your Benefits! Make This Meeting the First and Most Important Step in Transition

 

 

CVSO County Veterans Service Officer.

Who they are and who they work for. When leaving the military and searching for your next  mission or purpose, personal and family health should be the number one priority. The CVSO represents the veteran and not the VA / Veterans Administration. The primary work of the CVSO is to provide and explain every benefit you are entitled to. The CVSO will also explain and help you navigate the complexities of the VA system. Additionally, each county provides various community outreach programs such as help with job applications and transportation. Start this next mission or purpose in your life with a well defined plan of action and a complete understanding of your benefits as well as the resources available to assure a successful outcome for you and your family.

 

Washington County Veterans Service Officer: Kurt Rusch

Email: Kurt.Rusch@Washcowisco.gov

Ozaukee Country Veterans Service Officer: Kevin Johnson

Email: kmcjohnson@co.ozaukee.wi.us


DISCLAIMER: The information and content shared in each episode of the Stigma Free Vet Zone are for informational purposes only. The Stigma Free Vet Zone hosts, Mike Orban, Bob Bach and Erin Schraufnagel are not, nor claim to be, medical doctors, psychologists, or psychiatrists and should not be held responsible for any claims, medical advice, or therapy/treatment recommendations mentioned on this podcast. Any advice mentioned or shared by Mike Orban, Bob Bach, Erin Schraufnagel or their guests is strictly for purposes of bringing awareness to the veteran community and the services available. Please speak with a medical professional before taking any advice or starting any therapy or treatment discussed or shared on this podcast.

PTSD, Withdrawing From Psychiatric Drugs and the Upcoming Release of the Documentary “Medicating Normal”.

Angela Peacock, MSW served in the U.S. Army for seven years as a communications specialist. She deployed to Iraq in 2003 and was medically evacuated due to a non-combat, life-threatening illness. Angela Shares the years of profound life altering pain, loss of her marriage and other punishing reactions and effects of PTSD and withdrawal from psychiatric drugs. Angela shares how blind belief in medical treatment opened the door for much of what she experienced. She provides educational and valuable insights like informed consent and participating in our individual healthcare.    After medical retirement and a long period of recovery, she earned her bachelor’s in science in psychology and master’s in social work from Washington University in St. Louis.  Angela discusses her current work to plan and host community screenings of Medicating Normal across the world where members of the audience are invited to critically think about our modern mental health industry, informed consent, and psychiatric drug use and withdrawal. She is a mental health advocate, a writer, and YouTube creator who travels in her campervan across the United States with her service dog Raider, to improve the mental health care system for veterans and civilians alike. She can be found online @BeingHumanRV.

DISCLAIMER: The information and content shared in each episode of the Stigma Free Vet Zone are for informational purposes only. The Stigma Free Vet Zone hosts, Mike Orban, Bob Bach and Erin Schraufnagel are not, nor claim to be, medical doctors, psychologists, or psychiatrists and should not be held responsible for any claims, medical advice, or therapy/treatment recommendations mentioned on this podcast. Any advice mentioned or shared by Mike Orban, Bob Bach, Erin Schraufnagel or their guests is strictly for purposes of bringing awareness to the veteran community and the services available. Please speak with a medical professional before taking any advice or starting any therapy or treatment discussed or shared on this podcast.

 

War, Severe Struggles then Finding Peace on the Ranch | Ben Singleton

Ben Singleton grew up in a small town in northwest Indiana. He says the destruction of the World Trade Center on 9/11, which he watched on a television in a high school classroom, ignited a zeal within him to serve his country. He was 18 when he enlisted in the Army after graduation. A year later Ben deployed for the invasion of Iraq as a combat infantryman and paratrooper with the 82nd Airborne division. Three years later he deployed again, this time as a sniper and member of the 4th Infantry division. Singleton re-enlisted twice and left the Army in just under seven years after attaining the rank of Staff Sgt. When he returned to civilian life, Ben encountered a series of struggles, including a troubled marriage. He credits the support of family –mom, dad and younger brother—and friends, with helping him find a healthy way forward. Today, Singleton is the manager of therapeutic riding center called Heaven’s Gait Ranch which is located in a rural community north of Milwaukee. The ranch provides a variety of services to guests of all ages including veterans and individuals with special needs. Ben appreciates the opportunity to make connections with many different people. He calls the work deeply rewarding.


DISCLAIMER: The information and content shared in each episode of the Stigma Free Vet Zone are for informational purposes only. The Stigma Free Vet Zone hosts, Mike Orban, Bob Bach and Erin Schraufnagel are not, nor claim to be, medical doctors, psychologists, or psychiatrists and should not be held responsible for any claims, medical advice, or therapy/treatment recommendations mentioned on this podcast. Any advice mentioned or shared by Mike Orban, Bob Bach, Erin Schraufnagel or their guests is strictly for purposes of bringing awareness to the veteran community and the services available. Please speak with a medical professional before taking any advice or starting any therapy or treatment discussed or shared on this podcast.


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David Carlson, A lifetime of trauma meets an indomitable spirit!

David Carlson served two tours in Iraq, in ’04 and ’07, as an infantryman with the Army National Guard. His re-integration back into the community after his second tour presented many punishing challenges. Unbeknownst to him, his participation in combat exacerbated his underlying struggles in his childhood, presenting after Iraq in the form of addiction, depression, hyper vigilance, suicidal ideation, reoccurring nightmares, and flashbacks. David’s maladaptive coping resulted in his incarceration for just under 5 years in Wisconsin jails and prisons. Since his release from prison, David built on the fitness he used while incarcerated to manage anxiety and anger, as a tool to reach other veterans who were having similar experiences. This led into David becoming involved in multiple forms of advocacy work, and not just for veterans, but for many people struggling with the demons of their past. David graduated with honors with his BA in English from the University of Wisconsin—Eau Claire. He is the founder of C.C. We Adapt  www.ccweadapt.com  and is now in his first year of Law School. David’s greatest pride in life are his two sons, Knox and Lenox, and his wife Alicia– 


DISCLAIMER: The information and content shared in each episode of the Stigma Free Vet Zone are for informational purposes only. The Stigma Free Vet Zone hosts, Mike Orban, Bob Bach and Erin Schraufnagel are not, nor claim to be, medical doctors, psychologists, or psychiatrists and should not be held responsible for any claims, medical advice, or therapy/treatment recommendations mentioned on this podcast. Any advice mentioned or shared by Mike Orban, Bob Bach, Erin Schraufnagel or their guests is strictly for purposes of bringing awareness to the veteran community and the services available. Please speak with a medical professional before taking any advice or starting any therapy or treatment discussed or shared on this podcast.

He wrote, “Get me to the VA so they can stop someone else.”

The Capt. John D. Mason Program aims to save lives by utilizing Veteran peers that go into the community and locate Veterans in need engaging them in VA health services, and other community resources, to live a healthy, productive life.

Captain John D. Mason served in Vietnam with the Second Battalion, Twelfth Marines, Third Marine Division. He was awarded the Bronze Star Medal with the Combat “V” for his valor and honorable service. John reflected on his military training and values when faced with personal and professional challenges. John was kind, smart, funny, hardworking, and a man of impeccable values and integrity who loved his wife and two children, and friends deeply. He struggled silently for many years with depression and PTSD stemming from his time in Vietnam. John didn’t want to burden his family or friends with his inner struggles. That, combined with the stigma of mental illness, prevented him from seeking sufficient treatment for his symptoms.
In 2013, financial distress and pain from a back injury caused his illness to overpower him and he took his own life. John left five suicide letters, and wrote, “Get me to the VA so they can stop someone else.”
Our guests today, Project Coordinator Susan Smykal, Veteran Mark Flower and Veteran Chris Swift discuss the making and operation of the Captain John D.
With a focus on Veteran depression and suicide they will focus attention today on their new Gun Safe Storage Program and Gun Safety Program. With a special guest Afghanistan Veteran Matt McDonell. During readjustment Matt had experienced a crisis with prescription withdrawal. Not understanding where the effects would take him he chose to lock his weapons and give the key to a trusted employee. Matt describes the importance of this decision while in crisis. Matt is the founder of ‘Next 18’ golf camp for disabled veterans and first responders.
SEE More on Matt’s program at www.next18.org
The program is completed with additional resources resources and contact information.
We thank Joe and Jennifer Tate and the Medical College of Wisconsin for this and many other programs dedicated to improving the healthcare of veterans, military families and the human spirit.

DISCLAIMER: The information and content shared in each episode of the Stigma Free Vet Zone are for informational purposes only. The Stigma Free Vet Zone hosts, Mike Orban, Bob Bach and Erin Schraufnagel are not, nor claim to be, medical doctors, psychologists, or psychiatrists and should not be held responsible for any claims, medical advice, or therapy/treatment recommendations mentioned on this podcast. Any advice mentioned or shared by Mike Orban, Bob Bach, Erin Schraufnagel or their guests is strictly for purposes of bringing awareness to the veteran community and the services available. Please speak with a medical professional before taking any advice or starting any therapy or treatment discussed or shared on this podcast.

Losing the Present to the Past | Joe Pospichal

A native of Grafton, Wisconsin, Joe Pospichal graduated high school in 1984. The events of 9/11 — along with other incentives — made his military enlistment an easy decision. Joe deployed to Iraq leaving behind a pregnant wife. Working the roads outside the wire would profoundly alter Pospichal’s outlook on life with many nights the longing to be home with the love of his wife gave soothing sanity to life.

Punishing challenges to life, with his wife and two children, would lead to divorce and many regrets for Pospichal. A still-present battle with cancer arose which has gone into remission, but not without trailing health issues — including total double-hip replacement at 36.

From the glorious invisibility of a 20 year old soldier in a combat tanker division, through events leaving scars he could never not have foreseen: today, Pospichal is of positive mind and spirit.

His determination and introspection have him in control of how he views the world and responds. He is certainly a hero of mind and spirit.


DISCLAIMER: The information and content shared in each episode of the Stigma Free Vet Zone are for informational purposes only. The Stigma Free Vet Zone hosts, Mike Orban, Bob Bach and Erin Schraufnagel are not, nor claim to be, medical doctors, psychologists, or psychiatrists and should not be held responsible for any claims, medical advice, or therapy/treatment recommendations mentioned on this podcast. Any advice mentioned or shared by Mike Orban, Bob Bach, Erin Schraufnagel or their guests is strictly for purposes of bringing awareness to the veteran community and the services available. Please speak with a medical professional before taking any advice or starting any therapy or treatment discussed or shared on this podcast.

Rage and Reconciliation | Joe Campbell

In this segment of the Stigma Free Vet Zone, Vietnam veteran Joe Campbell reflects on his family’s experience during his active duty and beyond. We hear how Joe’s family grappled with the fear associated with not knowing where he was, what danger he might be facing, and if and when they might receive word that Joe had been killed.

Campbell describes his mother’s torment as her emotions swung from her unending fear for his safety overseas to gnawing heartache and helplessness for the man who returned home.

Relentlessly driven by rage, Joe’s family watched for decades as he descended further into isolation and violent nightmares fueled by alcohol. “Quit drinking or this is over,” demanded his wife.

Listen, as Campbell narrates what happens next (and guides us on his path to reconciliation).


DISCLAIMER: The information and content shared in each episode of the Stigma Free Vet Zone are for informational purposes only. The Stigma Free Vet Zone hosts, Mike Orban, Bob Bach and Erin Schraufnagel are not, nor claim to be, medical doctors, psychologists, or psychiatrists and should not be held responsible for any claims, medical advice, or therapy/treatment recommendations mentioned on this podcast. Any advice mentioned or shared by Mike Orban, Bob Bach, Erin Schraufnagel or their guests is strictly for purposes of bringing awareness to the veteran community and the services available. Please speak with a medical professional before taking any advice or starting any therapy or treatment discussed or shared on this podcast.

My Journey, From Betrayal to Peace

As the daughter of an active US Marine, Kim followed her father into service. Becoming a US Marine was a defining moment for Kim. She said it was one of the greatest achievements of her life outside of having her daughters. While serving, Kim was sexually assaulted. The trauma of that action left her feeling betrayed and alone. Getting out of that unit helped significantly, but when command shifted her back, things started to get bad again. Kim left the Marine Corps feeling betrayed and regretful of her time of service. Ashamed, she hid her service history until a friend coaxed her to seek help. Now, after treatments she is once again proud of her service and her accomplishments during her time in uniform. Currently she promotes kindness and racial justice through social media and local activism.


DISCLAIMER: The information and content shared in each episode of the Stigma Free Vet Zone are for informational purposes only. The Stigma Free Vet Zone hosts, Mike Orban, Bob Bach and Erin Schraufnagel are not, nor claim to be, medical doctors, psychologists, or psychiatrists and should not be held responsible for any claims, medical advice, or therapy/treatment recommendations mentioned on this podcast. Any advice mentioned or shared by Mike Orban, Bob Bach, Erin Schraufnagel or their guests is strictly for purposes of bringing awareness to the veteran community and the services available. Please speak with a medical professional before taking any advice or starting any therapy or treatment discussed or shared on this podcast.

A catastrophic fire and a tour in Vietnam led to a reverence for life | Larry Sorce

Larry Sorce’s reverence for life is linked to an experience that happened more than 60 years ago. He survived a fire that ignited just before dismissal on December 1, 1958 at Our Lady of the Angels school in Chicago. The blaze engulfed the building and claimed the lives of 92 children and 3 nuns.

A dozen years later Larry began his tour of duty in Vietnam as an Army supply officer. The post insulated him from the hazards of war. His good fortune only deepened his gratitude.

After a working career in Milwaukee, today Larry calls Nashville, Tennessee home. He continues his outreach to veterans and others offering support however and whenever he can.



DISCLAIMER: The information and content shared in each episode of the Stigma Free Vet Zone are for informational purposes only. The Stigma Free Vet Zone hosts, Mike Orban, Bob Bach and Erin Schraufnagel are not, nor claim to be, medical doctors, psychologists, or psychiatrists and should not be held responsible for any claims, medical advice, or therapy/treatment recommendations mentioned on this podcast. Any advice mentioned or shared by Mike Orban, Bob Bach, Erin Schraufnagel or their guests is strictly for purposes of bringing awareness to the veteran community and the services available. Please speak with a medical professional before taking any advice or starting any therapy or treatment discussed or shared on this podcast.

Iraq, Afghanistan I was there! Combat Medic | Chris Swift

I was born in Milwaukee and grew up on the northwest side.  My childhood was like many others, hanging out with neighborhood friends and playing sports and getting into our mischief.  I graduated from Milwaukee Madison HS in 1993, went to Carthage College, but at the time I was only worried about playing football and not engaging in class like I should’ve been.  I worked for a couple years prior to enlisting in the Army as a medic, the best job I ever had. At my first duty station in 2000, I worked in the ER at FLW, MO, there was no better place for me to be.   I learned the skills that would help me in combat later on.  I spent 55 months between Iraq and Afghanistan, there were good days and bad.  After I finished my time in Active Duty, I went home for the birth of my daughter and transitioned to the Reserves.  During my time in the reserves, I became an instructor, but my transition to the civilian world was not so good.  I had many underlying issues that I hadn’t dealt with.  I am an alcoholic who got three OWI’s, which is way less than I should’ve.  

After my third OWI, I went to inpatient rehab at the VA and spent seven months in jail.  After my release, I began working for the Captain John D. Mason Veteran Peer Support Program with the Medical College of Wisconsin.  I have since become a Certified Peer Specialist and take my experiences and try to help those who need help. I also share my story so that they don’t follow my poor choices.  I have found my purpose again in life because of the programs and work that I do now.


DISCLAIMER: The information and content shared in each episode of the Stigma Free Vet Zone are for informational purposes only. The Stigma Free Vet Zone hosts, Mike Orban, Bob Bach and Erin Schraufnagel are not, nor claim to be, medical doctors, psychologists, or psychiatrists and should not be held responsible for any claims, medical advice, or therapy/treatment recommendations mentioned on this podcast. Any advice mentioned or shared by Mike Orban, Bob Bach, Erin Schraufnagel or their guests is strictly for purposes of bringing awareness to the veteran community and the services available. Please speak with a medical professional before taking any advice or starting any therapy or treatment discussed or shared on this podcast.